metalgeardog:

CQC: Close Quarters Caringimage

(via maurihero)

vintageanchorbooks:

One of the three Murakami vending machines you can find at train stations in Poland.
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage hits U.S. bookstores (not vending machines, sadly) on 8/12/14!

vintageanchorbooks:

One of the three Murakami vending machines you can find at train stations in Poland.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage hits U.S. bookstores (not vending machines, sadly) on 8/12/14!

theparisreview:

“You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them. When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.” —Ray Bradbury
Illustration from the first serialization of the novel in Playboy (March, April, and May 1954).

theparisreview:

“You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them. When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.” —Ray Bradbury

Illustration from the first serialization of the novel in Playboy (March, April, and May 1954).

"My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané."

Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)

(via nnepenthes)

"A lot of novels bully us into assenting to their importance. I’m tired of that."

Nicholson Baker (via theparisreview)

"I secretly think reality exists so we can speculate about it."

Slavoj Zizek (via sisyphean-revolt)

"What if, however, humans exceed animals in their capacity for violence precisely because they speak? As Hegel was already well aware, there is something violent in the very symbolisation of a thing, which equals its mortification. This violence operates at multiple levels. Language simplifies the designated thing, reducing it to a single feature. It dismembers the thing, destroying its organic unity, treating its parts and properties as autonomous. It inserts the thing into a field of meaning which is ultimately external to it. When we name gold “gold,” we violently extract a metal from its natural texture, investing into it our dreams of wealth, power, spiritual purity, and so on, which have nothing whatsoever to do with the immediate reality of gold."

Slavoj Žižek, Violence (via heteroglossia)